BIZ/DEV

What’s in the Box? w/ John Starke | Ep. 75

March 28, 2023 Big Pixel Season 1 Episode 75
What’s in the Box? w/ John Starke | Ep. 75
BIZ/DEV
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BIZ/DEV
What’s in the Box? w/ John Starke | Ep. 75
Mar 28, 2023 Season 1 Episode 75
Big Pixel

In this episode David and Gary chat with John Starke, CEO/Engineer/Inventor and answer that age old question…what’s in the box????

Links:

https://zapier.com/blog/disagreement-at-work/

MyMatR LinkedIn

MyMatR Website



___________________________________

Submit Your Questions to:


hello@thebigpixel.net


OR comment on our YouTube videos! - Big Pixel, LLC - YouTube


Our Hosts

David Baxter - CEO of Big Pixel

Gary Voigt - Creative Director at Big Pixel


The Podcast


David Baxter has been designing, building, and advising startups and businesses for over ten years. His passion, knowledge, and brutal honesty have helped dozens of companies get their start.


In Biz/Dev, David and award-winning Creative Director Gary Voigt talk about current events and how they affect the world of startups, entrepreneurship, software development, and culture.


Contact Us

hello@thebigpixel.net

919-275-0646

www.thebigpixel.net

FB | IG | LI | TW | TT : @bigpixelNC


Big Pixel

1772 Heritage Center Dr

Suite 201

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Music by: BLXRR


Show Notes Transcript

In this episode David and Gary chat with John Starke, CEO/Engineer/Inventor and answer that age old question…what’s in the box????

Links:

https://zapier.com/blog/disagreement-at-work/

MyMatR LinkedIn

MyMatR Website



___________________________________

Submit Your Questions to:


hello@thebigpixel.net


OR comment on our YouTube videos! - Big Pixel, LLC - YouTube


Our Hosts

David Baxter - CEO of Big Pixel

Gary Voigt - Creative Director at Big Pixel


The Podcast


David Baxter has been designing, building, and advising startups and businesses for over ten years. His passion, knowledge, and brutal honesty have helped dozens of companies get their start.


In Biz/Dev, David and award-winning Creative Director Gary Voigt talk about current events and how they affect the world of startups, entrepreneurship, software development, and culture.


Contact Us

hello@thebigpixel.net

919-275-0646

www.thebigpixel.net

FB | IG | LI | TW | TT : @bigpixelNC


Big Pixel

1772 Heritage Center Dr

Suite 201

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Music by: BLXRR


David:

Hi, everyone, welcome to the biz dev Podcast, the podcast about developing your business. I am David Baxter, your host, and I am here with touch of gray for men clients, Gary voids, how's it going, man,

Gary:

touch of gray or touch for gray would you say, touch of

David:

gray, you know the thing, get your little, just a little gray in your beard, just so you look a little a little more man, if I needed

Gary:

that to look a little Well, I wouldn't say more manly, maybe a little older. But

David:

here's a fun fact. Fun fact, speaking of great Bill Clinton, when he ran for president back in whenever that was early 90s. He added touch of gray into his hair. So he would look more distinguished, he added gray to his hair. So he would look older because he was so young when he ran when he left office, he no longer needed to do that. It was all white case. So we're going to be talking today with John Stark, the CEO of my matter, is that is that correct? Am I saying the right matter? That is correct? Yes. Yes. Raka. Okay, we're going to talk about my matter and a little bit, but I wanted to dive in. We finished our series. So John, we've been doing a little series with our guests for the last five episodes on time management. And so I feel like I've put a little bow on that. And I'm moving into my next series, and this might not be a good series. So you might be the one and only but I'm gonna ask you, John, you have and I saw when I was reading a little bit about your company, you have five ish employees, is that correct?

John:

So we have right now to full time be to full time, including including myself, but I am a big proponent of hiring interns, and you know, getting people experience in the real world. So I've gone through a lot of hiring processes for interns.

David:

Okay, perfect. So hiring interns. Oh, man. Okay. That's a different conversation. But so my question is, and this is what I was thinking about, I was telling off before we started recording, I was at a chamber of commerce meeting last week. And they asked this question, it made me think about it. So I wanted to ask a few more guests. What are traits you look for when you're hiring someone? And I'm not talking about I mean, let's put aside that, can they do the job? Are they qualified? But that on the side? What is it that makes you hire or turn away? from either a full time employee or an intern? It doesn't really matter? Because does the these soft skills I would think, are universal? So what John, what are some some that you look for specifically?

John:

So the one thing I really look for is enthusiasm, because I believe that if you are enthusiastic, you can learn anything. It doesn't matter what your background is, what your degree is, due to the nature of our technology with being able to go into the University of YouTube, you can go off and learn anything, it's just are you enthusiastic? And are you gonna spend the time to go learn what you need to learn to get the job done?

Gary:

The University of YouTube, that's great.

David:

On our side, I always tap into passion. I call that passion. Do you have a passion. So in development land, if you're not a tinkerer, you're probably not going to enjoy what we do. Because I mean, it's development is one of those things, it can't be a punch in, punch out kind of thing. You got to really love it. So that's, I would, in our world, we would call that passion, but I love that the enthusiasm, there's a book that I read, it's a book is being very generous. It's like 30 pages long. It is the five C's and I'm, I'm gonna mess these up. I'm not gonna remember them all. I will bring them I'll bring the book in a future episode, but the five C's of hiring, look that up. I'll just plug it for now. It's like $3 on Amazon. But it's a wonderful book. And it was originally written for pastors, when they're hiring other pastors and stuff like that, but it's totally universal. It has nothing to do with necessarily hiring a pastor, like one of them was calling chemistry competency. Extreme. And there's two more. And there's they're just amazing things and they give you practical questions in the book to ask to your prospective hire. It's a way to dive in and ask, ask really great interview questions. So I'm not here to plug the book. I just it's a really good book. I've used those questions in the past anything else besides enthusiasm? Or is that the number one for you?

John:

That's the number one. I mean, definitely work experience is important. I am someone who went through college and I didn't have the best grades but I just kept taking classes because I love to learn and you know I think in the future people are really going to be paying attention to you know, what not what's not your GPA? But what's your portfolio look like? What have you accomplished? What have you done? Have you built some neat app on the side? In your free time? Have you explored new avenues and, you know, improved your skill set? Really. So definitely experience is a big thing. But it really comes down again, that skill set down, what are your basic skill sets that can be used?

David:

So if you're, I mean, in development land that works, right? I can tell somebody, Hey, I don't care where you went to school, I want to see what you've done. That works in the creative fields. But if I'm an accountant, what does that mean? I mean, I guess you have to check that box of square, I

John:

mean, at the same time, it's like, you can go and learn double entry bookkeeping online. And it's better, you know, if you have a degree to back that up, and it shows that, hey, you've really gone through the, you know, the years of schooling, but if you can show me as an artist, or as a welder, or somebody who is able to get, you know, their hands dirty, or even people just working in software, it's like, if you can show me what you've done, and, you know, the work that you've you've you've you've created, it's like, Alright, maybe I can, you know, take take their skill set, and then expand on what they already know, that will tailor to the company.

David:

Yeah, totally. I mean, it's kind of like when you're if you're a startup, and you're raising money, which I know, when I was doing my research, you guys went through an NCAA idea. You got someone that we

John:

went through the NCAA idea micro program, and we ended up being finalists in the program as well.

David:

The next stage, cool. So one of the things I've I've heard about people who've raised money, and when we've worked with those who have raised money, a lot of times they're not raising money, for the idea that they're currently working on. It's the team. And it's kind of the same thing you're saying when you're hiring is I might not necessarily be depending on the role. Of course, if I'm hiring a senior x, y and z, then obviously you got to be amazing at it. But if you're hiring kind of a junior thing, where you're kind of going outside of the box, Hey, who are you as a person? Can I mold you into what I need you to be? It sounds like it's something you're talking about?

John:

Yeah, I mean, you know, right now, my sales director, he's fresh out of college. And you know, he has an incredible amount of enthusiasm. But he doesn't have the years of experience. It's just the nature of being 22. So the fact that he has all this enthusiasm, and he can bring it to learning how we're going to go out and get sales, get customers engaged. I mean, it's going to take time, but it's something that, you know, I'm willing to work with him on improving not just his ability abilities, but my sales abilities as well.

Gary:

There's one thing to be said about someone with little experience in that field as well. They don't have bad habits that they've developed over the years, they don't have go twos and standbys, or that they use as crutches, they, they kind of have a new approach to it, which if you're learning sales, as well, like as a team together, that might actually be helpful for both of

John:

you. Well, and you know, through through the journey that I've gone, which I guess we'll talk about in a bit, but it's, I would I love to get information from the people who do have that touch of gray and who are have spent years learning about sales. And so I love going to and talking to consultants who have spent years in their fields because their their information and their experience is incredibly valuable.

Gary:

All right, John, well, why don't you tell us a little bit about your company my matter what type of business is it and how did you get started.

John:

So my matter is in the business of designing and manufacturing automatic sorting waste containers for public spaces. This system works by you walk by the device you throw something in it will identify what that object is and sorted into trash or recycling. Additionally it will tell the users or the collection service how full the containers are getting so that they can come and empty them when they are getting full. And it provides a lot of data in real time to to the organizations that own them about you know what type of waste is being discarded Are you seeing a lot of soda bottles in this waste container? Are you seeing a lot of Chick fil A bags? So a provides a picture of everything that's deposited to the to the customers?

David:

Sure way, way way way way I when

Gary:

I have questions,

David:

and you actually tell if there's a Chick fil A wrapper

John:

so so there is a camera in the device and it takes a picture of anything that's put into the device and it will analyze using AI to determine Hey, is this trash or recycling and the rules of recycling change from location to location we have the ability to adjust what goes into recycling some organizations don't want to have glass and their recycling stream. Sounds weird but they may not just not be able to take Get. So we have a very customizable system in both what can be deposited into trash and recycling? As well as how does this container look? You know, how big do you want the container to be? How do you want it to look on the outside? Do you want to put advertising on the side of it?

David:

But it's okay, so I'm gonna press because I'm just fascinated by this. Are you caught? adept enough to say that these are McDonald's wrappers? Or is it just

John:

foil at the current stage of our AI, it will say trash wrapper. We're, you know, we're we're working towards the, to the level of saying, hey, somebody threw a plastic bottle away. This is a plastic bottle that has Coca Cola branding on it, it has the lid on or off of it. There's something inside the plastic bottle that's not you know, you know, coke, maybe it's someone shoved a candy wrapper inside the plastic bottle, that that is possible. But we're currently at the stage of just basic Hey, is this trash or recycling?

Gary:

That's still so cool. So that is cool.

David:

I do. And that's done with one camera. I'm just imagining I'm just chucking this thing in and this like bounces four times off the sides. And your one camera catches enough.

John:

So interestingly enough, we have a whole process of being able to make sure we get a nice, clean, clear image. In the past, we have certainly had a lot of blurry images. But yeah, it's it's one camera,

Gary:

high speed cameras. One camera isn't taken like super high speed shutter No. Putting the like stitching the image together. No, it's

John:

actually, you know, off the shelf $10 Raspberry Pi camera.

David:

So my guess is you've got some sort of process that they throw the thing in there bounces around a little bit. But eventually it goes through a very small thing that you get to control. And it goes down slow. No.

John:

Oh, the way it works is that we have a box, we have the idiots Oh, no, it's all right. We have a container that's built in such a way where there's a box essentially, above to waste containers, the trash and recycling container. So a lot of people like to say, Hey, John, what's in the box? Well, inside this box is what we call our sword box. And that's where the lights and the camera and all the action happens where we, you know, take take a good picture of whatever has been deposited. And you know, we've designed this in such a way where it's supposed to be, hey, you walk down Main Street, you're at RDU airport, and you're busy, you're just walking by you gotta throw something away. You may not be thinking about is it trash or recycling. So this will take care of that for you, it will ensure that it gets the item will get properly recycled. But a lot of people like to throw a bunch of things away at the same time. And we recognize that we can't sort five different things at once, we have to make a decision. And we put that up to the customer to say do you want to reduce your recycling contamination? Or do you want to divert more materials from the landfill? Are you willing to take some recycling contamination some people are. So we really want to make sure the customer like it solves their problem. That's the whole point of this company is to really help solve the customer's problem.

David:

So how did you come up with this idea? Like, I mean, where did the impetus come from? Were you just seeing a lot of contaminated recycling bands? Like, ah, I could do this better? I mean, where did the

John:

so yeah, so the idea really came from I like to drink soda and Gatorade and I had a lot of metal cans and plastic bottles. And I thought, Okay, I've got to be able to capture some sort of value from this. So the idea originally started with how do I develop a device for in the home that people could throw away, metal, glass, plastic, whatever, whatever they want to throw away, and it would automatically sort it for them. And then, you know, an Uber, like collection service comes around and picks up their waste and delivers it directly to the recycling mills. So the cans would be going directly from a house to, you know, a place where they're melt down the aluminum. As I further like learned about this industry, you know, it's like, okay, that device is a little bit more challenging to do due to the cost of everything. But it's not out of the realm of possibility. But we found that public spaces is really the way to enter into this market. As I've heard from many waste managers and sustainability coordinators, away from home recycling is atrocious and it can only get better.

David:

I love the idea of it. So how where are you in your process? I know you raise a little bit of money. You are I saw All that you have some out in the wild? Are you in prototype stage? Are you in full blown? Let's rock this,

John:

I would like to say that we are about to enter full blown, Let's rock this thing. We've been flying on the radar that's been flying under the radar for a while, simply because we really want to make sure it's not just the product, but it's the entire system behind the product. You know, how do people interact with the device? Both? You know, everyone just discarding waste, the waste collectors, the managers, the VPS. You know, like, we want to make sure everybody who is going to be involved in this in this device, you know, is getting what they want. And there's a lot of back end systems that we had to setup as well and understand like, hey, how do we get this AI model accurate. So we're definitely at the point right now where we are ready to go to market. We have some organizations that were lining up to do some pilots, we've piloted in the past with other organizations, but those really were earlier generation models that we were trying to get the, you know, the bugs worked out and figure out the flow process of, you know, how you go from discarding an item to all the way to data analysis.

David:

How I have so many questions. It's just such an interesting concept. Like a throw away my Coke, right? And it's just sprout all over the place, because it's half full. How does it not gunk up

John:

all your gear? Yes. So first of all, why are you throwing away half a coke? I mean, what a waste my

David:

daughter, that's all she's gonna drink. That's it. She buys the whole coke and throws half of it away.

John:

So. So we've seen a lot of interesting things deposited into these waste containers. As as one of us, one of one of the guys on the team has coined the term goop. You know, we've seen the Starbucks, the Starbucks goop in there. And so the system is designed to kind of be self cleaning in such a way where the goop will kind of slide off into into the trash side. But you know, we recognize it as a trash can. It's dirty, it's disgusting, there is some maintenance required when it comes to the waste collectors come around, and they can just wipe down the inside. But we really focus on not adding more work to their to their workload. But you know, it's we really tried to figure out how to engineer a good self cleaning system to handle the goop.

David:

Nice. So okay, so you're in pro, you're about to go with some prototypes out there, you've got a good product. Now, Pat, you've gotten some good feedback, you're in that loop. So your goal is to sell them in municipalities generally, is that large companies?

John:

Yeah. So the goal, the goal really is and you know, you're talking we're talking about John Austin earlier than CID. And, you know, he really likes to hit home and say, you know, John, you can't you can't sell to everyone you got to you got to really fine tune that selling. And because I originally approached this with, well, we sell to people who want to, you know, reduce recycling contamination, that's really our biggest focus. But we have found that the people who focus on reducing recycling contamination aren't going to be, you know, the municipalities, there are some companies like BMW who we've piloted with, who are very interested in the product. But, you know, municipalities have a lot more volume that they're going to be seeing in terms of recyclables, cans, and bottles, universities as well, they've been a really great testing ground, but also they really focus on education. And we don't want to just supply a product that is this black box where people throw things away, we want to be able to provide feedback. So we've got a display screen on the device that helps both the collection service know how full it is, but also tells people Hey, what you just threw away went into recycling. These are how many items we've diverted from the landfill, similar to those water bottle refilling stations. You know, we want to make sure people understand the value of this device and the use it's getting

Gary:

seems like that kind of feedback would actually encourage good habits. minutes. That's pretty cool.

David:

I've noticed in my neck of the woods, I live up in Wake Forest, and they have replaced all of the municipality things downtown. The normal trash bins with these have a funny name. I can't remember what tobasically big belly, no big belly. That's it big belly. And it's really interesting. Like they don't do what you do. They're basically a solar power trash company, right? That's their whole thing. But it's like there's six or seven of these guys out they're all doing different things. But they're all competing because there's really only one trash can right I'm not I don't need six trash cans. It's one municipality buying all their trash cans. Right

John:

right. Um, I actually we have piloted with Wake Forest We got a lot of great feedback from them. And they have said that they are interested in the device. But you know, we were at a point where we didn't have exactly what they wanted. And so, you know, we had to go back to the drawing board and adjust a bit, but yeah, they the big bellies, you know, those those are devices that are geared towards reducing the, the, the size of the waste, essentially, by compaction. So they can essentially, you know, you can get more volume inside of a waste container, that was their entire focus, we like to, which makes it we'd like to say that we're the next generation of smart ways container where we're doing this automatic sorting inside of the inside of the box.

David:

So next, you got to sort of then squish it. That's there's fate version. So

John:

we've talked to a lot of people. And it was interesting to hear feedback regarding compaction. But people certainly do like the sorting aspects. So that's really where the focus is right now.

Gary:

So you mentioned earlier that you're looking for sales assistant, and you were also trying to learn sales. So is that the phase that you're moving forward with now is just trying to get this product out to more? Yeah, please, through a sales process? Are you trying to start like a networking process just to get people to see,

John:

we have a small network, we are going to be exhibiting at the Carolina recycling Association, conference in Wilmington, in late March. And that's a pretty big recycling conference. In this area. And you know, we were there last year, we were kind of we were there the year before, but we, you know, are growing our network. And as I said earlier, we've been kind of flying under the radar because we want to make sure we're solving the customer's problems. And there's a lot of problems in getting this technology put together. A lot of lot of moving parts and a lot of non moving parts that require attention. But I have a sales director now. And he's been incredibly helpful in figuring out how do we grow our pipeline? How do we get out there more? You know, right now, we're in a position where our website we know is not up to date. And that's a big push that we're doing in the next month and a half to update the website for people to really make sure that they understand what it is we are offering.

David:

So one of the things we talk about a lot is a concept we call the slug. The slog is the stage of every startup, every business, that you have created a product, you're ready to go. And you're proud of it and you get it out there and no one cares.

Gary:

And how much slog did you spend on the goop?

David:

Stop it. How long have Are you feel like you're still in the slog that you're trying to explain why you're better? Or are you starting to see some traction? Like it usually takes a year or two to really get through that and start great creating your own gravity where people start saying, hey, that product, that's awesome. Let's do this. Are you feeling that slog is that mean? Because in my opinion, that's one of the most tiring parts of creating a new company.

John:

So I think we're nearing the end the end of the slog, I have been, I think I'm pulling myself out of it, and I'm about to wash myself off of it. When it comes to, like, you know, burnout and all that stuff, I definitely can say that, yeah, you know, the company. And personally, I've been through a lot of, you know, ups and downs. You know, they say, you know, burning the candle at both ends, I think, I think it feels like the candle has been placed next to a big roaring fire. So the entire thing is kind of melting. But just know, we're, we're definitely towards the end of that. And it comes back to you know, we've we've put devices out there, we've tested them, we've gotten the feedback, and you can't just sell, you know, this, this black box, you know, it does these amazing things, but you really have to engage with your customers, and you have to make them understand and take a sense of ownership of this device. There's a lot of levels to waste collection that we found, and there can be a lot of outsourcing and contracting. And what we've learned from piloting with some organizations is, you know, we need to make sure we understand who is in charge of this device and who is going to take responsibility. And that's been part of the slog, whereas, you know, that's that's not just that's not just the hardware, that's a service aspects. And this this whole entire company has been dealing with hardware software and kind of a service aspect as well.

David:

I love that. I mean, it's it's so nice. And we've we've talked to guys all over the spectrum, as it were to people who are about to get into the slog to people who've been out of it for 20 years, right and remembering the slog, and they you know, they kind of shudder a little bit, but you're kind of one of the first thing Gary Craig If I'm wrong here, but that's right on the cusp of getting out of it. And so it's like you're a little more optimistic you're not quite so beaten down. And because it's like you always see the brand new puppies who are about to go into the slog, and then you see all men coming out of it. It's like Bill Clinton, we were talking about this gray hair,

Gary:

considering where you are and where you're planning on going so far, what are the top three pieces of advice you can give an entrepreneur or new business starting up? Based on your experience?

John:

Ron, I mean, no, no, not that. I, I would say the number one thing that stands above all else is you need to find a problem and need to and you need to fall in love, the process of solving it. I absolutely love what I do. Now, because I did enjoy my last engineering job, I had a lot of variety. I'm someone who likes variety. But I have even more variety now. And sometimes it's overwhelming. But you know, if you really want to be happy, you know, in life, when working, you know, you want to be able to be in love with what you do. So you know, as a founder, you're going to be doing a bit of everything. So kind of get used to the variety early on. I would say that's my number one thing. Number two, talk to as many people as possible. I have very supportive parents. And my mother has been kind of since day one that I've been doing this just going out and absorbing information like the sponge she is. And she's been incredibly helpful in proving you know, my knowledge base. And then my father is just always reminding me to go out and eliminate your blind spots and talking to people, advisors, fant, friends, families, people who like the idea people who hate the idea, I don't care. Tell me your thoughts. I want to hear it. So as as an entrepreneur, well as an entrepreneur, like you're, you're in the thick of things all the time, and you need to hear just from a bunch of different people what they think from the outside, especially

David:

not to interrupt because I know you have number three, but I have to ask the question, what are your parents do because they sound amazing, ah, most parents have no idea what you're doing much less be able to offer that kind of advice.

John:

It's a benefit

David:

is your dad, John Austin.

John:

My, my parents, I don't want to say Mike, they're retired. Because my dad says he'll never retire. He's that type of guy who always just want to do and mom just is just she being an only child, I get a lot of attention.

David:

Good and bad. Well, they give great advice. That is good advice.

Gary:

And it's great that you have to kind of cheerleaders and I guess you can say like consultants in your pocket. And

John:

there are some disadvantages with the parents being on the board of directors. But you know, that's, that's, that's a, that's a moot point. I wouldn't be where I am today without them. But the third item, so the company has a journey. And you know, the journey comes from an idea. And that idea comes from you, the founder will be ready to analyze all three of those levels, because you're going to want to and especially the self level, because you're going to be analyzing, okay, what's the next important thing to do in the company? How we have limited resources? How do we optimize? You're going to want to analyze the idea. I mean, this started out as I said, a device where people can have it in their homes, and I went out and designed miniaturized industrial grade shredder, because I thought oh, people would want to have their way shredded, no, no. So the idea needs to be analyzed from time to time. But more importantly, like you got to analyze yourself. I mean, it's it this has been definitely a big growing process for my myself, not just the company. I'm a big fan of the confidence curve. Also known as the Dunning Kruger effect, I believe where you know, there's you get that you get the high you get to a point where you you think you know everything. And then you realize, oh, boy, I don't know anything. And then you start to realize no, I know some stuff. I know some stuff I'm coming out of the valley of

Gary:

the more you know, the more you realize there's more to learn. Yeah, it's that constant.

John:

And you really need to do that self now, self analysis and figure like really early on especially early on, figure out what your strengths and weaknesses are. And then find people who can help you with your weaknesses. You know, it may be it might be as simple as outsourcing your marketing because you might be an intern verted engineer who doesn't want to talk to people as much, but at the same time, you know, go back and analyze yourself over, you know, over the course of, you know, three months, six months, whatever interval makes sense, because as you grow and the company grows, you're going to realize, oh, I may not have that weakness anymore. I mean, I love talking to customers. Now, I don't like cold calling, I will never like cold calling. But I love talking to customers. But when I first started, I was very scared. It was just something I wasn't as comfortable with as I am with the technology.

Gary:

Yeah, being able to transform a bit is we hear that a lot from other entrepreneurs and small business owners is you go in with a passion to do one thing, and then quickly realize that you're also responsible for everything else. So you have to kind of morph into those things.

David:

Well, I can tell you, though, your future a little bit here, because right now you're wearing a lot of hats. And you're doing hats, you don't want to. But the future is that you're going to start unloading those hats, and you're going to be handing those hats to other people. And the first thing you're going to want to get rid of are the things you hate doing. Because if you hate doing them, if you find someone who does love doing them, then they're going to be much better at it than you are. Right, and you're gonna be given that you'll happily give that hat away. But the real hard one is in the future. And this is where we talked about time management a lot in the last several weeks. The hard one is when you give away the hat of the things you love to do. Because now you have other things you have to do as the leader, you have other things that only you can do. So now the engineering or the stuff that you really love, you got to hand that off. And that's really hard. But that's coming. And it's it's a weird thing. But it's, it's very cool, because then you find that you love other things, right? It's it just morphs your, your your day to day, but but I would say if I were given advice to someone in your position, it would be to, as soon as you can, as soon as it is viable, right? Sometimes you got to wear all the hats, but as soon as it is viable, Delegate what you hate. And find that nerd who loves it, right? You gotta find the accountant, right? Who loves those numbers or whatever, or find that sales guy who just loves talking to people, right, who find that person and hand that hat off. And that's a really big jump in terms of productivity for you and your company.

John:

Yeah, I mean, it's it ultimately comes down. I completely agree it really like what pushes the company forward. And yeah, if I can find a better operations person or technical, you know, engineer, then yes, by all means, like, we have to go and meet those milestones.

David:

You know, what was interesting to me, I cannot remember who it was, because that's not something I ever can do. But it was one of our guests. And they wanted a new CEO, because they knew they weren't it. And that was like, Man, that is some self reflection right there. That impressive. They're like, I'm not the leader. I'm the doer, and I'm gonna promote up and big stay the doer. And I was like, Wow, that's pretty awesome. I just really interesting how someone had that kind of humility, right? Because very several are like, I'm not, I'm not really good at this. I shouldn't be the leader I am until they can replace me. I was like, Wow, man. Anyway. So if we wanted to learn more about my matter, and and more about you, and so where would we find that?

John:

Ah, well, I would definitely say go to the website. But right now, the website is a little bit out of date. So in the next month and a half, we're going to have a huge update to that so that people can really understand you know, what it is we offer, but the website currently right now is my matter. It's m YMATR. Corp. corp.com. Additionally, I mean, I, if anyone had any questions for me, I love questions, it comes back to eliminating blind spots. You know, my my contact is John J. O H n dot Stark STR ke at my matter corp.com

Gary:

We're gonna have links in the show notes to both your LinkedIn page and your website as

David:

well. Alrighty, well, Gary, if they wanted to get in touch with us, how would they do that?

Gary:

They leave a comment or a question below this video on YouTube. Or they can email us at Hello at the big pixel.net could also reach out to any one of our social media channels. Even tick tock

David:

thank you so much, John, for joining us. This has been really great, really interesting. I love your idea. I love the enthusiasm you're bringing new founders are always uh, who to talk to. I said, hoot that makes me old. All right.

Gary:

And I'm from Texas. But I really liked the idea and the concept behind the company. That sounds really cool. And I can see, once you do get that gravity and that traction, it seems like this isn't going to be the end of what you guys are doing. And it sounds like you have plans or at least you didn't say it but it seems like you have plans to kind of scale this up in multiple ways. So looking forward to see how it goes for you.

David:

Well, thank you so much for joining us, man. We will talk to everybody next week thank you